Brooke Paints

 

 

Pure Pleasure
Pure Pleasure 26x36" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 NFS
Bethany
Bethany 24x30" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 SOLD
Ana Amrikanaya (I'm American)
Ana Amrikanaya (I'm American) 30x40" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2005 SOLD
On the Streets of Buenos Aires
On the Streets of Buenos Aires 32x36" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2006 NFS
Tres Amigos
Tres Amigos 36x72" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 SOLD
The Silk Dress
The Silk Dress 36x24" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 SOLD
Alone
Alone 24x36" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2006 NFS
Abuelita
Abuelita 30x40" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2006 SOLD
Reflecting
Reflecting 40x28" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 $1800
Reading Ondaatje
Reading Ondaatje 18x24" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 SOLD
Creation
Creation 28x22" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2005 NFS
Self Portrait by Candlelight
Self Portrait by Candlelight 30x24" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2008 SOLD
Ghana Boy
Ghana Boy 22x22" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2005 NFS
Nathaniel
Nathaniel 36x24" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2007 $1500
Ullu Cammii
Ullu Cammii 24x36" oil painting on canvas by Brooke Walker-Knoblich ©2006 SOLD

PROJECTED PORTRAITS: 2005 ~ 2008

I began my first major body of figurative work upon graduation from UC San Diego in 2005. This collection of large oil paintings was inspired by my travels, friends and family, and the roles modern technology can play in contemporary photorealism. I was first introduced to the use of the digital projector as a drawing aid by my professor Amy Adler and later pursued David Hockney's book "Secret Knowledge" which posed the controversial theory that many old masters used optical aids to create their realistic perspectives and proportions. Hollywood more recently explored the same theory in the film Tim's Vermeer to a painstaking degree to prove its effectiveness.  The digital projection process is often criticized as "cheating" because the artist can project an image onto the canvas, trace the outlines of the composition to exact proportion and then "simply" color in between the lines. As a young artist, I used the digital projector as a technical opportunity to bifurcate the complexities of painting: I could focus solely on mastering the color glazing I was introduced to in Paris and avoid the frustrations of achieving an accurate drawing.  Using a projector also enabled me to work largescale in my small studio where otherwise I would have needed to step back quite a distance to check accuracy. 

After painting in this manner for several years, I realized I was stuck in a rut. I knew I had become too dependent upon the digital projector when my drawing skills failed to progress and I had yet to express my love for impressionism and energetic brushwork (which were at odds with the polished photorealism I was achieving through the projection process). I knew my stagnation was due in part to working exclusively from photos but also recognized that isolation ( I had been working on my own with no involvement in the contemporary art world) was taking its toll. Thus began my commitment to spend the next several years working exclusively from life and to become active in the Sacramento arts scene. I started attending open studio figure drawing sessions and found artist Earl Boley to paint with on a weekly basis. In 2010 I enrolled in a summer workshop at the Florence Academy of Art to further my experience of painting a live figure in oil and spent the remainder of my time in Sacramento working with the Mahony Group and Debbie Gualco at Capital ArtWorks